Showing the DataGravity Difference and Opening Eyes at VMUG – Now Trending

As we’ve watched various aspects of the Discovery Series resonate with attendees at VMware user group events (VMUGs) this fall, I’ve really enjoyed showing trends in our concluding demonstration.  In one of my past professional lives, I spent many years working for a leading retailer as a storage administrator and IT manager.  There, I saw the power of trend analysis and learned how this data could actually be used not only to report activity, but to really positively impact the bottom line. Though I wouldn’t be so bold as to claim that trend analysis – whether it’s collected through the Discovery Series, or by manually pulling together an overview  – could be a surrogate for more powerful predictive analytics tools and applications, it is interesting to note that the data exposed in such reports can go a long way towards helping users understand which trends are a part of regular business activities and which may be worrisome if they continue.

Trending
Here at DataGravity, in keeping with our belief that businesses should and could do more with the data they store, we thought it would be interesting to show prospective customers how the Discovery Series can uncover trends which may be beneficial to the business. This demonstration was illustrated using a series of invoices for shoes purchased from an athletic footwear distributor that were accumulated over time. (The data did not come from an actual DataGravity customer, but it was representative of the data sets that companies like a footwear distributor might pull trends from).

In this screen, we can observe trending within a mount point called “Campaign” that has a directory called “Invoices” for Athletic shoes with names such as “ADIPURE”, “AIRJORDAN7” and “AIRFORCEIII”. Trending, by nature, means to look for changes or developments in a general direction.

In this screen, we can observe trending within a mount point called “Campaign” that has a directory called “Invoices” for Athletic shoes with names such as “ADIPURE”, “AIRJORDAN7” and “AIRFORCEIII”. Trending, by nature, means to look for changes or developments in a general direction.

The DataGravity engine analyzed the data and created a detailed trending effect chart, which showed which styles of athletic footwear were in demand monthly, seasonally and by region, at a level that many data scientists would find enlightening. Merchandising, sales and store management employees could use this information to inform point-of-purchase (POP) display tactics, or ordering and inventory activities. Further, the Discovery Series is capable of creating this type of trending analysis inside VMs and outside on mount points – another feature that really impressed the demo’s audience. While the trending demo, the dormant data and the PII data demos we presented at recent VMUG events were all enthusiastically received, there are plenty of other examples of how data-aware storage is resonating with IT pros and system admins throughout North America. Now that we’re shipping, I’m sure our customers will uncover many other great use cases for us to demonstrate – after all, as every organization’s data has unique needs, each has its own potential for the value that data-aware storage can unlock. Here’s hoping we will meet you at an upcoming VMUG or another event soon, and show you how DataGravity can help your organization. Want to learn more about data-aware storage and ask your own questions?  Check out our demo page or attend our next weekly demo.

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Enrique Barreto

Enrique Barreto

Enrique Barreto is a regional engineering director for United Data Technologies. A veteran of storage and information technology, Enrique was formerly with EMC in technical sales and as a senior technical consultant. He previously worked as an IT Manager at retailer Talbots and as a technical sales consultant at Comark. Enrique resides in Tampa with his family and is a proud graduate of the University of South Florida.