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Why I Joined DataGravity

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With the news that I have joined DataGravity as vice president of engineering, I wanted to take some time to discuss why I decided to join the start-up company and what my expectations are for launching a product this year and what we’ll do to follow up the launch.

Simply put, joining a start-up is inspiring.  I thrive on the excitement of being at a place that is doing something truly innovative.  At DataGravity, we’re really building something brand new here that will make storage an active asset for SMBs – one that will empower our client companies to more effectively manage their data.  It’s also exciting to work with an engineering team that is so experienced. I look forward to building this group into a larger team that shares the same vision – that we’re here to build something that’ll truly ‘wow’ our customers.

That commitment to ‘wow’ is embodied in the vision and leadership of Paula Long and John Joseph – two key movers and tech visionaries– who changed the customer experience for storage during the first decade of the 2000s with EqualLogic.  They made the commitment to build something here at DataGravity that is revolutionary, not evolutionary.  They’ve created an environment here where we can collaborate as a team of experienced entrepreneurs, while maintaining the excitement that comes with a young and promising start-up.  And they both are hyper-focused (as we all are) on delivering a product this year that will truly redefine storage.

Having worked as an engineer for more than 30 years in various leadership roles launching numerous products while building engineering teams and scaling companies across the industry, I appreciate this focus and vision.  For example, when I joined Virtual Iron Software as an early stage company in 2003, I had the opportunity to create software that competed with VMware vSphere.  I managed to help scale the engineering team and we succeeded in delivering a product that delivered such value to customers that we were recognized and acquired by Oracle.  What made this possible was that we built a great product  – one that harnessed the excitement and commitment of the leadership team. That same spirit is here at DataGravity.

The engineering team, early stage employees, investors and advisors have also come aboard here at DataGravity with a firm resolve to reshaping storage.  We’re building a product that will help our customers truly harness the power of storage.  We’ll be adding functionality in future releases that will continue to support the needs of a market clamoring for storage that not only offers capacity but also helps with protection, governance and intelligence.  That’s what I’m looking forward to: building a world-class storage platform that will make data even more meaningful and valuable for SMBs today and in the future.

From our recent office move to award nominations, the momentum around DataGravity is undeniable.  Although the last few weeks here have been a whirlwind, I’m truly excited to be joining at this stage in the company’s existence and enjoy working with an immensely talented crew of engineers on what is promising to be one of the most exciting launches in recent memory.

 

If you want to stay up-to-date on what we are planning over the next several months, be sure and catch all the latest information through our Twitter account, @DataGravityInc.

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About Steve Noyes

Steve is vice president of engineering at DataGravity. Before DataGravity, he worked for both Equipe Communications and Avid Technologies as vice president of engineering and held senior engineering roles at Digital Equipment Corporation. In 2003 he joined Virtual Iron Software as one of the company’s earliest employees as vice president of engineering and led the company’s successful development of virtualization products. In 2009 Virtual Iron Software was acquired by Oracle Corporation where Steve remained as vice president of engineering until joining DataGravity in April of 2014